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Fatma Bucak, "And men turned their faces from there"

SAHA supported the production of Fatma Bucak’s new works for her solo exhibition at Brown University David Winton Bell Gallery held between 19 November 2016–5 February 2017.

This exhibition presents a body of new works addressing the current political situtations and conflicts in the world. Including selections of Bucak’s previous works from the Mexico–U.S. border, Dakhla refugee camp in Western Sahara, and a conversation on the Turkish-Armenian border, this exhibition is her North American solo-premier.

The works included in “And Men Turned Their Faces from There” are at once both meticulous and perplexing, inviting viewers to participate in the negotiation of borders whether physical, ideological, conceptual, or ethical. Definitions and perceptions of nationalism, ethnicity, religion, and gender are held to question. Bucak’s new works, in particular, provide powerful and moving prompts to reflect on the shared experiences of political violence, oppression, and suppression within communities throughout the world.  

About Fatma Bucak

Fatma Bucak (Iskenderun) graduated from the Royal College of Art in London with a MA in Photography. Bucak also studied Graphics at the Accademia Albertina di Belle Arti and Philosophy at the Istanbul University.

Bucak's works bring together performance, video and photography and portray observations from reality as well as constructed fictional and mythological frames. In her works, a certain stance of sexual identity brings various stories that carry truth and political power into a mise en scene. Within this view, issues such as male dominance, religion, cultural displacement, presence and absence are tackled with a clearly pragmatic approach. Fatma Bucak lives and works in London and Istanbul.

About the Brown University David Winton Bell Gallery

The David Winton Bell Gallery is Brown University's contemporary art gallery and home to an important part of the university's permanent art collection. The gallery hosts four to five major exhibitions each year, as well as annual exhibitions of student artwork and a triennial exhibition of artwork by Brown faculty members. Broadly concerned with the exhibition of exemplary work by artists living today, the gallery takes pride in showing artwork irrespective of media, content or subject and makes special efforts to support and show the work of emerging or under-recognized practitioners locally, nationally and internationally. Alongside the contemporary arts, the gallery also makes use of its art historical collections, programming exhibitions on the arts and culture of the last five centuries. The Bell Gallery maintains a permanent collection of more than 6,000 works of art, dating from the 16th century to the present, with particularly rich holdings in contemporary art and works on paper.